The Development of Northeast Marceline

by Marilyn Foley

The small town of Marceline, Missouri, was gradually growing in population and expanding in area. By the turn of the century she was a prosperous mining center. The Santa Fe Railroad had been going through since 1887.

J. C. Taylor owned approximately fifty acres of ground in the northeast part of Marceline. … > More >

Memories of Marceline

The early days of the “Magic City” (as our town was called) were marked by excessive unlawfulness. Fights, murders and thievery being in the headlines as did incendiary fires which did a lot to make our early history black. If a Saturday night passed without two or three fist fights on main street ending up … > More >

Marceline Jubilee

EVENTS THAT WILL BE CONTINUOUS DURING THE JUBILEE

June 29 – July 4.

  • Jubilee House – at corner of Howell and Kansas Avenue. Decorated with antiques in the manner of a house of 1888.
  • Nike Missile – at the corner of Howell and Kansas Avenue. Modern technology at its most destructive force.
  • Agriculture Display
> More >

Marceline Coordinated Welfare Council

It was through the letter from the Social Planning Committee of the Marceline Community Chest, sent to all Federated Clubs and organizations in April 1950, that the group now known as Marceline Co-ordinated Welfare Council was started.

On May 1, 1950 under the sponsorship of the Theodore Roosevelt Post #264 and Auxiliary twenty-five persons representing … > More >

From the Marceline Mirror Jan. 1895

In 1890 we were counted for the work Uncle Sam proposed to put on the press, entitled, “A Census of the United States,” and at that time our population was 1,922 souls. Recently a scheme to quietly take the census was sprung by Dr. J. H. Perrin and other progressive men, and J. T. Ruberson … > More >

C. W. A. Sewing Room

As was done in many communities during the economic relapse of the mid-thirties, Marceline organized a timely service for the relief of needy individuals. It began in 1934 when Mayor B.J. Thomas appointed Edna Locke Thomas (now Mrs. Otis DeLong) to supervise a sewing room in the basement of Carnegie Library and lasted until 1938. … > More >